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Mar
4th
Sun
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When I muse about memes, I often find myself picturing an ephemeral flickering pattern of sparks leaping from brain to brain, screaming "Me, me!".
Douglas Hofstadter, American academic whose research focuses on consciousness, analogy-making, artistic creation, literary translation, and discovery in mathematics and physics, Pulitzer Prize laureate, Metamagical themas: questing for the essence of mind and pattern, Basic Book, 1985, p. 52.
Jan
13th
Fri
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Chance favors the connected mind.
Steven Johnson, American popular science author, Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation, Riverhead Hardcover, 2010.
Nov
21st
Mon
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Look what is coming: Technology is stitching together all the minds of the living, wrapping the planet in a vibrating cloak of electronic nerves, entire continents of machines conversing with one another, the whole aggregation watching itself through a million cameras posted daily. How can this not stir that organ in us that is sensitive to something larger than ourselves?
Kevin Kelly, writer, the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, What Technology Wants, New York: Viking, The Penguin Group, 2010 cited in Playing the Infinite Game, Reality Sandwich
Sep
29th
Thu
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Tim O’Reilly on the Birth of the global mind

“Computer scientist Danny Hillis once remarked, “Global consciousness is that thing responsible for deciding that pots containing decaffeinated coffee should be orange.” (…)

The web is a perfect example of what engineer and early computer scientist Vannevar Bush called “intelligence augmentation” by computers, in his 1945 article As We May Think” in The Atlantic. He described a future in which human ability to follow an associative knowledge trail would be enabled by a device he called “the memex”. This would improve on human memory in the precision of its recall. Google is today’s ultimate memex. (…)

This is man-computer symbiosis at its best, where the computer program learns from the activity of human teachers, and its sensors notice and remember things the humans themselves would not. This is the future: massive amounts of data created by people, stored in cloud applications that use smart algorithms to extract meaning from it, feeding back results to those people on mobile devices, gradually giving way to applications that emulate what they have learned from the feedback loops between those people and their devices.” ”

Tim O’Reilly, the founder of O’Reilly Media, a supporter of the free software and open source movements, Birth of the global mind, Financial Times, Sept 23, 2011 See also: ☞ Vannevar Bush on the new relationship between thinking man and the sum of our knowledge (1945)
Sep
14th
Wed
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What is the significance of the Internet and today’s communications revolution for the evolution of the mind?

Steven Pinker: “Probably not much. (…) In terms of strict biological evolution, it’s impossible to know where, if anywhere, our species is going. Natural selection generally takes hundreds of thousands of years to do anything interesting, and we don’t know what our situation will be like in ten thousand or even one thousand years. Also, selection adapts organism to a niche, usually a local environment, and the human species moves all over the place and lurches from life style to life style with dizzying speed on the evolutionary timetable. Revolutions in human life like the agricultural, industrial, and information revolutions occur so quickly that no one can predict whether the change they will have on our makeup, or even whether there will be a change.

The Internet does create a kind of supra-human intelligence, in which everyone on the planet can exchange information rapidly, a bit like the way different parts of a single brain can exchange information. This is not a new process; it’s been happening since we evolved language. Even non-industrial hunter-gatherer tribes pool information by the use of language. (…)

That has given them remarkable local technologies—ways of trapping animals, using poisons, chemically treating plant foods to remove the bitter toxins, and so on. That is also a collective intelligence that comes from accumulating discoveries over generations, and pooling them amongst a group of people living at one time. Everything that’s happened since, such as writing, the printing press, and now the Internet, are ways of magnifying something that our species already knew how to do, which is to pool expertise by communication. Language was the real innovation in our biological evolution; everything since has just made our words travel farther or last longer.” “
Steven Pinker, Canadian-American experimental psychologist, cognitive scientist and linguist, ☞ Organs of Computation, Edge, January 11, 1997
Sep
8th
Thu
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I believe that the mycelium operates at a level of complexity that exceeds the computational powers of our most advanced supercomputers. I see the mycelium as the Earth’s natural Internet, a consciousness with which we might be able to communicate.
Paul Stamets, American mycologist, author, Mycelium Running, cited in ☞ Google and the Myceliation of Consciousness
Sep
6th
Tue
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The web essentially is a planetary-scale nervous system where individual minds take on the role of synapses, firing electrical pattern-signals to one another at light speed — the net effect being an astonishing increase in creative output.
Jason Silva, Venezuelan-American television personality, filmmaker, gonzo journalist and founding producer/host for Current TV, Connecting All The Dots, Dec 10, 2010
Sep
3rd
Sat
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The great driver of scientific and technological innovation [in the last 600 years has been] the increase in our ability to reach out and exchange ideas with other people, and to borrow other people’s hunches and combine them with our hunches and turn them into something new.
Steven Johnson, American popular science author, Where Good Ideas Come From, Riverhead Hardcover, 2010 See also: Steven Johnson on Where Good Ideas Come From, Brain Pickings
Sep
1st
Thu
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Reality is a battle of opposing metaphors playing out/in the canvas of the collective mindscape.
Miles Hingston, Polytopian, Researcher, Writer, Introduction and Disclaimer, 2011
Aug
7th
Sun
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Is it a fact - or have I dreamt it - that, by means of electricity, the world of matter has become a great nerve, vibrating thousands of miles in a breathless point of time? Rather, the round globe is a vast head, a brain, instinct with intelligence!
Nathanial Hawthorne, American novelist and short story writer (1804-1864), The House of the Seven Gables, Chapter 17, (1851)
Jul
29th
Fri
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College: two hundred people reading same book. An obvious mistake. Two hundred people can read two hundred books.
John Cage, American composer, philosopher, poet, music theorist, artist, printmaker (1912-1992), M: Writings 1967-1972 (tnx libraryland)
Jul
3rd
Sun
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The book of the past reveals its individual experience uniquely. The book of the future reveals our collective experience uniquely.
Craig Mod, writer, designer, publisher and developer, Post-Artifact Books and Publishing, June 2011
Jun
23rd
Thu
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Kevin Kelly: ‘We are moving from the culture of the book to the culture of booking’
"Imagine a future where instead of lending someone a book, you lend them your bookmarks. Where your notes, annotations and references are synchronized across platforms and applications. Where your bookmarks belong to you, and a record of every book you read is saved and stored securely, no matter how or where you read it."

— James Bridle, who is developing Open Bookmarks

Viewing a book as a process rather than artifact. (…)

We are moving from the culture of the book to the culture of booking. Our focus is no longer on the book, the noun, but on booking, the verb — on that continuous process of thinking, writing, editing, writing, sharing, editing, screening, writing, screening, sharing, thinking, writing — and so on that incidentally throws off books. Books, even ebooks, are by-products of the booking process. (…)

Booking produces relationships. Booking is a process that connects readers, authors, characters, ideas, and stories into complex webs. There will be a million ways to weave these relationships.”

Kevin Kelly, writer, the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, Post-Artifact Booking, The Technium, 19 June 2011
Jun
20th
Mon
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'We are information experiencing information. Human are anti-entropic phenomenon'

Kevin Kelly, founding editor of Wired Magazine, referring to technological evolution as following the momentum begun at the big bang - he has stated:

"The story and game begin at the beginning. As the undifferentiated energy at the big bang is cooled by the expanding space of the universe, it coalesces into measurable entities, and, over time, the particles condense into atoms. Further expansion and cooling allows complex molecules to form, which self-assemble into self-reproducing entities. With each tick of the clock, increasing complexity is added to these embryonic organisms, increasing the speed at which they change. As evolution evolves, it keeps piling on different ways to adapt and learn until eventually the minds of animals are caught in self-awareness. This self-awareness thinks up more minds, and together a universe of minds transcends all previous limits. The destiny of this collective mind is to expand imagination in all directions until it is no longer solitary but reflects the infinite.”

Kevin Kelly, the founding executive editor of Wired magazine, and a former editor/publisher of the Whole Earth Catalog, cited in Jason Silva, We are information experiencing information: an experimental essay in “Intertwingularity”, Big Think, June 4, 2011.