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"Everything you can imagine is real."— Pablo Picasso

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Aug
28th
Wed
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… all experience delivered in such detail that the fictions seemed facts, and the facts? The facts insisted on themselves.
Christine Schutt, American novelist and short story writer, Prosperous Friends, Grove Press, 2012.
May
26th
Sun
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To seek for yesterday

Claus Narr (d.1515), the court jester, in reply to the Elector of Saxony Johann Friedrich I, who was lamenting that he had “lost the day”:

Morgen wollen wir alle fleissig suchcn, und den Tag, den du verloren hast, wohl wieder finden.

(Tomorrow we will all diligently seek for the day you have lost, and no doubt we shall find it again).
cited in Wolfgang Bütner in: 627 Historien von Claus Narren, 21, 51 (1572). (Image)
May
2nd
Thu
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For Children: You will need to know the difference between Friday and a fried egg. It’s quite a simple difference, but an important one. Friday comes at the end of the week, whereas a fried egg comes out of a chicken. Like most things, of course, it isn’t quite that simple. The fried egg isn’t properly a fried egg until it’s been put in a frying pan and fried. This is something you wouldn’t do to a Friday, of course, though you might do it on a Friday. You can also fry eggs on a Thursday, if you like, or on a cooker. It’s all rather complicated, but it makes a kind of sense if you think about it for a while.
Douglas Adams, English writer and dramatist (1952-2001), The Salmon of Doubt: Hitchhiking the Galaxy One Last Time (2002)
Aug
25th
Sat
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James T. Kirk: "You know, coming back in time, changing history… that’s cheating.
Spock Prime: "A trick I learned from an old friend.
Jul
23rd
Mon
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“Few years ago the city council of Monza, Italy, barred pet owners from keeping goldfish in curved goldfish bowls. The measure’s sponsor explained the measure in part by saying that it is cruel to keep a fish in a bowl with curved sides because, gazing out, the fish would have a distorted view of reality.” “
Stephen Hawking, British theoretical physicist and author, Leonard Mlodinow, The Grand Design, Random House, 2010. (Illustration: M. C. Escher, Hand with Reflecting Sphere (1935)  
See also: Council bans goldfish bowls, ABC News, July 24, 2004. 
May
26th
Sat
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On the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much - the wheel, New York, wars and so on - whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man - for precisely the same reasons.
Douglas Adams, English writer and dramatist (1952-2001), The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, Pan Books, 1979, Chapter 23
Mar
5th
Mon
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Well, I don’t like the first bit and I don’t know the last bit. So I’m really hoping the middle bit is exceptional.
Eoin Colfer, Irish writer, Artemis Fowl: The Lost Colony, Chapter 11: A Long Way Down, Puffin Books, 2006.
Mar
4th
Sun
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He was also mistaken in supposing that he was dealing with the laws of thought: the question how people actually think was quite irrelevant to him, and if his book had really contained the laws of thought, it was curious that no one should ever have thought in such a way before.
Bertrand Russell paid George Boole an extraordinary compliment: "Pure mathematics was discovered by Boole, in a work which he called the Laws of Thought.”, Mysticism and logic, and other essays, Rowman & Littlefield, 1981, p.59. cited in James Gleick, The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood, Pantheon Books, New York, 2011, p. 167.
Jan
3rd
Tue
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There was a man who became so intrigued with watching salamanders, that he ended up as a salamander watching the man he was.
Julio Cortázar, Argentine writer (1914-1984)
Dec
18th
Sun
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There are no exact guidelines. There are probably no guidelines at all. The only thing I can recommend at this stage is a sense of humor, an ability to see things in their ridiculous and absurd dimensions, to laugh at others and at ourselves, a sense of irony regarding everything that calls out for parody in this world. In other words, I can only recommend perspective and distance. Awareness of all the most dangerous kinds of vanity, both in others and in ourselves. A good mind. A modest certainty about the meaning of things. Gratitude for the gift of life and the courage to take responsibility for it. Vigilance of spirit.
Václav Havel, Czech playwright, essayist, poet, dissident and politician. Former President of Czechoslovakia and the first President of the Czech Republic, (1936-2011), Address upon receiving the Open Society Prize awarded by Central European University, 24 June 1999.
Nov
7th
Mon
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Eternity is very long, especially towards the end.
Woody Allen, American screenwriter, director, actor, comedian, cited in Martin Rees, Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces that Shape the Universe, Basic Books, 1999, p. 71.
Oct
23rd
Sun
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“Humpty Dumpty: the purest embodiment of the human condition. Listen carefully, sir.

What is an egg? It is that which has not yet been born. A paradox, is it not? For how can Humpty Dumpty be alive if he has not been born? And yet, he is alive - make no mistake. We know that because he can speak. More than that, he is a philosopher of language. ‘When I use a word, Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, it means just what I choose it to mean - neither more nor less.

The question is, said Alice, whether you can make words mean so many different things.

The question is, said Humpty Dumpty, which is to be master - that’s all.’ ” “
Paul Auster, American author known for works blending absurdism, existentialism, crime fiction and the search for identity and personal meaning, Peter Stillman in the City of Glass, Faber & Faber, 1987
Oct
4th
Tue
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Turtles Upon Turtles: Turtles All the Way Down

"A well-known scientist once gave a public lecture on astronomy. He described how the earth orbits around the sun and how the sun, in turn, orbits around the center of a vast collection of stars called our galaxy. At the end of the lecture, a little old lady at the back of the room got up and said:

“What you have told us is rubbish. The world is really a flat plate supported on the back of a giant turtle.”

The scientist gave a superior smile before replying, “What is the turtle standing on?”

"You’re very clever, young man, very clever,” said the old lady. “But it’s turtles all the way down!”

— cited in Stephen Hawking’s, A Brief History of Time, 1988

“Turtles all the way down” is a jocular expression of the Infinite Regress problem in cosmology posed by the “Unmoved Mover” paradox. A comparable metaphor describing the cause and consequence problem as a cycle is the “Chicken and Egg” problem. In epistemology the problem is known as the Münchhausen Trilemma.”

Wiki (tnx  turtlesuponturtles) (Illustration source)
Sep
10th
Sat
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Computers: They are useless. They can only give you answers.
Pablo Picasso, Spanish painter, draughtsman, and sculptor (1881-1973), cited in William Fifield, In Search of Genius, 1982, p. 140, and p. 40.