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Apr
5th
Fri
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“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” “
Buckminster Fuller, an American engineer, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor, and futurist (1895-1983)
Nov
19th
Mon
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Bruno Munari, Italian artist and designer (1907-1998), cited in Keri Smith, How To Be An Explorer of the World: Portable Life Museum, Penguin Books, 2008, p.116.
Nov
17th
Sat
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The Algorithm: Idiom of Modern Science

“The Algorithm's coming-of-age as the new language of science promises to be the most disruptive scientific development since quantum mechanics. (…)

Computer is a storyteller and algorithms are its tales. (…) Computing is the meeting point of three powerful concepts: universality, duality, and self-reference. In the modern era, this triumvirate has bowed to the class-conscious influence of the tractability creed. The creed’s incessant call to complexity class warfare has, in turn, led to the emergence of that ultimate class leveler: the Algorithm. Today, not only is this new “order” empowering the e-technology that stealthily rules our lives; it is also challenging what we mean by knowing, believing, trusting, persuading, and learning. No less. Some say the Algorithm is poised to become the new New Math, the idiom of modern science.” “
Bernard Chazelle is the Eugene Higgins Professor of Computer Science at Princeton University, The Algorithm: Idiom of Modern Science, Princeton 2006
May
24th
Thu
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" "We are the descendants of those who were most successful at finding patterns. This process is called association learning and is fundamental to all animal behavior, from C. elegans to H. sapiens. I call this process patternicity, or the tendency to find meaningful patterns in both meaningful and meaningless noise.”
Michael Shermer, American science writer, historian of science, founder of The Skeptics Society, The Believing Brain: From Ghosts and Gods to Politics and Conspiracies — How We Construct Beliefs and Reinforce Them as Truths, New York: Times Books, 2011. (tnx Wildcat)
May
9th
Wed
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The mathematician’s patterns, like the painter’s or the poet’s must be beautiful; the ideas like the colours or the words, must fit together in a harmonious way. Beauty is the first test: there is no permanent place in the world for ugly mathematics.
G. H. Hardy, was a prominent English mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis (1877-1947), A Mathematician’s Apology (1941)
Mar
4th
Sun
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When I muse about memes, I often find myself picturing an ephemeral flickering pattern of sparks leaping from brain to brain, screaming "Me, me!".
Douglas Hofstadter, American academic whose research focuses on consciousness, analogy-making, artistic creation, literary translation, and discovery in mathematics and physics, Pulitzer Prize laureate, Metamagical themas: questing for the essence of mind and pattern, Basic Book, 1985, p. 52.
Jan
15th
Sun
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“There are only patterns, patterns on top of patterns, patterns that affect other patterns. Patterns hidden by patterns. Patterns within patterns.

If you watch close, history does nothing but repeat itself.

What we call chaos is just patterns we haven’t recognized. What we call random is just patterns we can’t decipher. What we can’t understand we call nonsense. What we can’t read we call gibberish.” “
Chuck Palahniuk, American transgressional fiction novelist and freelance journalist, Survivor, W. W. Norton, 1999. (Illustration: Termes Thoughts) See also: ☞ ‘To understand is to perceive patterns’
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Memories are not static entities; over time they shift and migrate between different territories of the brain. (…)

Where memories might be stored. (…) The answer lies in the multitude of tiny modifiable connections between neuronal cells, the information-processing units of the brain. These cells, with their wispy tree-like protrusions, hang like stars in miniature galaxies and pulse with electrical charge.

Thus, your memories are patterns inscribed in the connections between the millions of neurons in your brain. Each memory has its unique pattern of activity, logged in the vast cellular network every time a memory is formed. It is thought that during recall of past events the original activity pattern in the hippocampus is re-established via a process that is known as “pattern completion”. (…) The physical structure of your brain is malleable.
Hugo Spiers is a neuroscientist and lecturer at the institute of behavioural neuroscience at University College London, What are memories made of?, The Guardian, Jan 14, 2012.
Jan
12th
Thu
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Much education today consists of a high degree of specialization, which tends to give a person tunnel vision and a narrow perspective about the actual interrelationships of all physical phenomena. Students of the future would be encouraged to view the world in a more holistic manner; accordingly, they would be able to converse intelligently across various disciplines.
Jacque Fresco, self-educated structural designer, philosopher of science, concept artist, educator, and futurist, The Best That Money Can’t Buy: Beyond Poverty, Politics, & War, Global Cyber Visions, 2002 (tnx mymindtank)
Jan
11th
Wed
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Understanding order begins with understanding patterns.
R. Buckminster Fuller, American engineer, systems theorist, author, designer, inventor, futurist and second president of Mensa International (1895-1983)
Dec
27th
Tue
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Coral reefs are sometimes called “the cities of the sea”, and part of the argument is that we need to take the metaphor seriously: the reef ecosystem is so innovative because it shares some defining characteristics with actual cities. These patterns of innovation and creativity are fractal: they reappear in recognizable form as you zoom in and out, from molecule to neuron to pixel to sidewalk. Whether you’re looking at original innovations of carbon-based life, or the explosion of news tools on the web, the same shapes keep turning up. (…)

When life gets creative, it has a tendency to gravitate toward certain recurring patterns, whether those patterns are self-organizing, or whether they are deliberately crafted by human agents.
— Steven Johnson, author of Where Good Ideas Come From, cited in ‘To understand is to perceive patterns’ - B. Fuller, Powell, Johnson, West, Kurzweil & video narration by J. Silva
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" "The pattern, and it alone, brings into being and causes to pass away and confers purpose, that is to say, value and meaning, on all there is. To understand is to perceive patterns. (…) To make intelligible is to reveal the basic pattern.” “
Isaiah Berlin, British social and political theorist, philosopher and historian, (1909-1997), The proper study of mankind: an anthology of essays, Chatto & Windus, 1997, p. 129. See also: ☞ ‘To understand is to perceive patterns’ - B. Fuller, Powell, Johnson, West, Kurzweil & video narration by J. Silva
Oct
4th
Tue
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Q: One of my favorite definitions of time is that time is what stops everything happening at once. I wonder if music is what stops noise happening all at once? (…)

I’m sure when the first abstract paintings appeared, people said, “No figure, no structure,” etc… The point about melody and beat and lyric is that they exist to engage you in a very particular way. They want to occupy your attention.

I wanted to hear a music that could create an atmosphere that would support your attention but still let you decide where it was directed.
Brian Eno, English musician, composer, record producer, singer and visual artist, known as one of the principal innovators of ambient music, in conversation with the novelist David Mitchell, Brian Eno: Success ruins artists, Salon.com, Oct 1, 2011
Sep
8th
Thu
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The task is, not so much to see what no one has yet seen; but to think what nobody has yet thought, about that which everybody sees.
Erwin Schrödinger, Austrian physicist and theoretical biologist who was one of the fathers of quantum mechanics, Nobel Prize laureate (1887-1961)
Sep
6th
Tue
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Ray Kurzweil: “I describe myself as a patternist, and believe that if you put matter and energy in just the right pattern you create something that transcends it. Technology is a good example of that: you put together lenses and mechanical parts and some computers and some software in just the right combination and you create a reading machine for the blind. It’s something that transcends the semblance of parts you’ve put together. That is the nature of technology, and it’s the nature of the human brain. Biological molecules put in a certain combination create the transcending properties of human intelligence; you put notes and sounds together in just the rightcombination, and you create a Beethoven symphony or a Beatles song. So patterns have a power that transcends the parts of that pattern.” “
Ray Kurzweil,  American author, inventor and futurist, cited in Jason Silva, Connecting All The Dots, Dec 10, 2010