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"Everything you can imagine is real."— Pablo Picasso

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Nov
3rd
Sun
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The present is the instant in which the future crumbles into the past.
Jorge Luis Borges, an Argentine short-story writer, essayist and poet (1899-1986), paraphrased by Susan Sontag in Letter to Borges
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Everything made now is either a replica or a variant of something made a little time ago and so on back without break to the first morning of human time. This continuous connection of time must contain lesser divisions. The narrative historian always has the privilege of deciding that continuity cuts better into certain lengths than into others. He never is required to defend his cut, because history cuts anywhere with equal ease, and a good story can begin anywhere the teller chooses.
George Kubler, an American art historian and among the foremost scholars on the art of Pre-Columbian America and Ibero-American Art (1912-1996), The Shape of Time: Remarks on the History of Things, New Haven: Yale University Press, 1962, p.2.
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" "Take the familiar "tick-tock", of the clock. Well, the clock doesn’t go "tick-tock" at all; it goes "tick-tick", every tick producing the same sound. It’s just that our consciousness runs two successive ticks into single "tick-tock" experience - but only if the duration between ticks is less than about three seconds. A really big pendulum clock just goes "tock…tock…tock…", whereas a bedside clock chatters away: "ticktockticktock…" "
Paul Davies, an English physicist, writer and broadcaster, a professor at Arizona State University, About Time Einstein Unfinished Revolution, Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 1995, p. 265-266.
Nov
2nd
Sat
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But how carve way i’ the life that lies before,
If bent on groaning ever for the past?”

— Robert Browning, Balaustion’s Adventure, Smith, Elder and co, 1871, p. 140.

The petty done, the undone vast,
This present of theirs with the hopeful
past! (…)

And yet—she has not spoke so long!
What if heaven be that, fair and strong
At life’s best, with our eyes upturn’d
Whither life’s flower is first discern’d,
We, fix’d so, ever should so abide?
What if we still ride on, we two
With life for ever old yet new,
Changed not in kind but in degree,
The instant made eternity

— Robert Browning, The Last Ride Together

“[T]he flowers of the future-in-the-present are far brighter than this southern gaudy melon-flower here and now. (…) [I]t is the pregnancy of the present that makes it meaningful. (…)

Like the bird the poet of this lyric sings twice over so as to recapture the first moment, to bind his day together, to redeem the past from its pastness, to put futurity into the present."

— Clyde de L. Ryals about Browning’s "Home-Thoughts, From Abroad" in Becoming Browning. The Poems and Plays of Robert Browning, 1833-1846, Ohio State University Press, 1983 p. 214
Robert Browning, English poet and playwright (1812-1889)
May
26th
Sun
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To seek for yesterday

Claus Narr (d.1515), the court jester, in reply to the Elector of Saxony Johann Friedrich I, who was lamenting that he had “lost the day”:

Morgen wollen wir alle fleissig suchcn, und den Tag, den du verloren hast, wohl wieder finden.

(Tomorrow we will all diligently seek for the day you have lost, and no doubt we shall find it again).
cited in Wolfgang Bütner in: 627 Historien von Claus Narren, 21, 51 (1572). (Image)
Mar
2nd
Sat
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High up in the North in the land called Svithjod, there stands a rock. It is a hundred miles high and a hundred miles wide. Once every thousand years a little bird comes to this rock to sharpen its beak.

When the rock has thus been worn away, then a single day of eternity will have gone by.
Hendrik van Loon, a Dutch-American historian and journalist (1882-1944), The Story of Mankind, cited in Twitter, xkcd, what if?, Feb 2013.
Jan
1st
Tue
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“New Year’s Eve. It’s a promise of a night. Single, married or widowed, in love, loveless or lovelorn, we all leave our apartments and pick through snow in high heels, or descend subway stairs in tuxedos, lured to wherever we’re going—whether we know it or not, would deny it or not — by the kiss of a stranger.” “
Jardine Libaire is an American writer based in Brooklyn, New York, Here Kitty Kitty: A Novel, Back Bay Books, 2005.
Dec
9th
Sun
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It became obvious that the notion of time, as our ancestors had transmitted it down the millennia, was in fact absurd claptrap.
Marcel Aymé, French novelist, children’s writer, humour writer and also a screenwriter and theatre playwright, (1902-1967), The Problem of Summertime in The Man Who Walked Through Walls, Pushkin Press, 2012.
Aug
28th
Tue
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“…now that the future has arrived, (…) arrived and steadily pouring through the pinhole of the present, into the past.” “
John Banville, Irish novelist, adapter of dramas, and screenwriter, cited by James Gleick (Illustration)
Apr
11th
Wed
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Mono-no-aware means literally “the pathos of things”, also translated as “an empathy toward things”, or “a sensitivity to ephemera”, is a Japanese term used to describe the awareness of impermanence, or the transience of things, and a gentle sadness (or wistfulness) at their passing. — (Wiki)

Mono means things, and aware comes from the ancient Japanese exclamation ‘Ah(a)!’. In early Heian times (794-1185) aware became a noun designating a profound and individual emotion that one experiences in communion with the transient beauty of a person, an event, a natural object or a work of art. Aware is sometimes called the ‘ah!-ness of things’ you feel when confronted with beauty and at the same time are conscious of the transience or incompleteness of this beauty. Aware transcends the feelings of sadness and joy and merges these into a new, profound emotion. (…)

In the 12th and 13th centuries Southern France saw the troubadours turning their feelings of love, what they called fin’amor, into exquisite poetry. The basis of fin’amor was an emotion called joy. Joy caused an ecstatic experience in which the lover appreciated simultaneously the happiness as well as the sadness, the gaiety as well as the pains, of loving. The same is true for 'mono no aware', where an object, person or situation can cause a feeling encompassing happiness as well as sadness, and where experiencing both elements is essential to the emotion. When one experiences fin’amor one forgets all about oneself. One can live life without the obstructions from one’s self-created ego and enjoy every component of one’s emotions, be they happy or sad.”

Mono no Aware - A Sensitivety to Things
Dec
28th
Wed
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In this world, time has three dimensions, like space. Just as an object may move in three perpendicular directions, corresponding to horizontal, vertical, and longitudinal, so an object may participate in three perpendicular futures. Each future moves in a different direction of time. Each future is real. At every point of decision, the world splits into three worlds, each with the same people, but different fates for those people. In time, there are an infinity of worlds.
Alan Lightman, American physicist, writer, and social entrepreneur. He is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Einstein’s Dreams, London, Vintage, 2004.
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Consider a world in which cause and effect are erratic. Sometimes the first precedes the second, sometimes the second the first. (…)

Each act is an island in time, to be judged on its own. It is a world of impulse. It is a world of sincerity. It is a world in which every word spoken speaks just to that moment, every glance given has only one meaning, each touch has no past or future, each kiss becomes a kiss of immediacy.
Alan Lightman, American physicist, writer, and social entrepreneur. He is a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Einstein’s dreams, Pantheon Books, 1993, p. 38.
Nov
7th
Mon
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Eternity is very long, especially towards the end.
Woody Allen, American screenwriter, director, actor, comedian, cited in Martin Rees, Just Six Numbers: The Deep Forces that Shape the Universe, Basic Books, 1999, p. 71.
Oct
23rd
Sun
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Memory is the space in which a thing happens for a second time.
Paul Auster, American author known for works blending absurdism, existentialism, crime fiction and the search for identity and personal meaning.