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"Everything you can imagine is real."— Pablo Picasso

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Jan
14th
Sat
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The Future Belongs to the Curious


“We’re all born with it. Albert Einstein dubbed it “holy,” Alistair Cooke called it “free-wheeling intelligence.” It’s that piquing force that nudges us to try it again, explore it some more, poke at it, question it and turn it inside out. From the moment we open our eyes, it fuels our existence. With each new answer we find, our world expands and our passions grow. We can’t wait to share what we’ve learned and teach others how to do it themselves. (…) The future belongs to the curious. The ones who are not afraid to try it, explore it, poke at it, question it and turn it inside out.” “
Manifesto, Skillshare, Jan 10, 2012
Apr
3rd
Sat
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Jorge Luis Borges on the informative power of art

The task of art is to transform what is continuously happening to us, to transform all these things into symbols, into music, into something which can last in man’s memory. That is our duty. If we don’t fulfill it, we feel unhappy. A writer or any artist has the sometimes joyful duty to transform all that into symbols. These symbols could be colors, forms or sounds. For a poet, the symbols are sounds and also words, fables, stories, poetry. The work of a poet never ends. It has nothing to do with working hours. Your are continuously receiving things from the external world. These must be transformed, and eventually will be transformed. This revelation can appear anytime.

A poet never rests. He’s always working, even when he dreams. Besides, the life of a writer, is a lonely one. You think you are alone, and as the years go by, if the stars are on your side, you may discover that you are at the center of a vast circle of invisible friends whom you will never get to know but who love you. And that is an immense reward."  

Jorge Luis Borges, speaking to Argentinian filmmaker German Kral (video tnx myserendipities)

Oct
6th
Tue
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What is Wisdom? What one generation can pass to another.

Andrew Zuckerman new book and project. Inspired by idea that one of the greatest gifts one generation can pass to another is the wisdom it has gained from experience, the Wisdom project seeks to create a record of a multicultural group of people who have all made their mark on the world. Presented agains the same white space, all of the subjects are removed from their context, which not only democratizes them, but also allows for a clear dialogue to exist between them.

Sep
2nd
Wed
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A Record Of Life – a beautiful short animation made by Owen Gatley and Luke Jinks based on the scientific recording of lifes great species and how this has given us clues that piece together, for us to discover the secrets of the evolution and diversity of life on Earth.

May
22nd
Fri
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City of books

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The Pale Blue Dot is a photograph of planet Earth taken in 1990 by Voyager 1 from a record distance (4 billion miles away), showing it against the vastness of space. In a commencement address delivered May 11, 1996, Carl Sagan related his thoughts on the deeper meaning of the photograph:

"Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we’ve ever known.”

Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, New York: Random House, 1994, p.8-9

May
20th
Wed
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Experience The Walker Library of Human Imagination (More: aminotes)

May
19th
Tue
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Think Different. "Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square hole. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do." — Apple Computer Inc